Archive for the Kindle Category

Launch-Day Contest (& giveaway)

The Gender Experiment releases Tuesday, May 24!gender exp

I’m excited about this book and eager to get it into the hands of readers. Sometimes I think of it just as “The Experiment” because it’s different from anything I’ve written. Yet, Agent Bailey, the high-functioning sociopath from Point of Control, is back. And The Gender Experiment is a fast-paced, crime-fiction thriller with multiple points of view, so the focus, structure, and writing will be very familiar to readers.

I hope you’ll give it a try. Beta readers say it’s the best novel I’ve written, and bestselling author J Carson Black says it’s the best book she’s read this year. She calls it “riveting and original” and says she fell in love with the characters.

I could really use your help promoting the book, so I’m hosting a launch-day contest. Anyone who posts a review or social media link to the book will be entered to win a Kindle Paperwhite. I’m also giving away three Amazon gift certificates and a signed print copy. Here’s the universal link: http://amzn.to/1Np9uLC

To enter, after you’ve posted, just contact me at lj@ljsellers.com. You can send a screenshot, but I’ll probably go on the honor system. If your email shows up at my other address, that’s okay too. Or if you copy/tag/@ me on the tweet or post, I’ll see it and enter your name.

If you’re willing to read the story and post a review on launch day or soon after (if you like it!), contact me and I’ll send you an ebook. ljsellers.novelist@gmail.com

I’m trying to make the launch support easy, so here are a few posts you can copy and paste on Tuesday.

“Riveting and original” is how readers describe THE GENDER EXPERIMENT, a new thriller by L.J. Sellers. Get one now! http://amzn.to/1Np9uLC

Check out THE GENDER EXPERIMENT, a new thriller by @LJSellers. “Riveting and original.” Get one now! http://amzn.to/1Np9uLC #thriller

A young morgue intern goes after a ruthless military researcher. THE GENDER EXPERIMENT is “riveting and original.” http://amzn.to/1Np9uLC

The author of the bestselling Jackson series releases THE GENDER EXPERIMENT. “Riveting and original.” Check it out! http://amzn.to/1Np9uLC

Thanks for all your support! I love what I do, and I write for my readers, but I couldn’t do this without you.

6 Ways to Read an E-Book

LJ with KindleSeveral readers have e-mailed me and said, “I’d really like to read your e-books, but I don’t how… Which inspired me to put together this list:

1. Buy an e-reader: Kindle is the most popular, but there’s also the Nook (Barnes & Noble), Kobo (Borders), Sony Pocket Reader, Pandigital Novel, and many more. When you make your choice, think about more than the device and price. Read more

More Books for the Blind

It is serendipitous that I became aware of the National Federation of the Blind’s complaints against Kindle just days after deciding to make my novels more accessible to visually impaired readers. NFB is filing a lawsuit claiming that Kindle’s lack of a voice menu makes the device impossible for blind people to use. Several universities are supporting  NFB by boycotting the product as a replacement for text books until Kindle makes the e-reader more accessible to the visually impaired. Read more

Kindle Readers Aren't Snobs

“It’s really expensive,” she [Sara Nelson, ex-editor of Publishers Weekly] said of the Kindle 2, which Amazon sells for $359. “If you’re going to pay that, you’re giving a statement to the world that you like to read – and you’re probably not using it to read a mass market paperback.”

What? Kindle readers are too high-minded for mass market paperbacks? Hah! Do Kindle readers have a type? If I had to guess, I’d say they have two shared characteristics: they love to read and they’re not afraid of new technology.

What is Nelson saying anyway? Because the Kindle is expensive, you shouldn’t read genre fiction on it? You mean like drinking Budweiser out of a champaign flute? As though there’s something low-class about mass market paperbacks!

The article went to say when people read on Kindles, you can’t see their book titles, so you can’t make judgments about what they’re reading. It’s about time. That’s why I sell more copies of The Sex Club on Kindle than anywhere else. People don’t have to ask out loud for it or let anyone see their purchase, which readers have admitted was embarrassing for them.

Meanwhile, here’s the top 10 selling books on Kindle last week. If they’re not mass market paperbacks now, most of them will be in a few months.

  1. Long Lost by Harlan Coben
  2. New Moon by Stephenie Meyer
  3. Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
  4. Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer
  5. Breaking Dawn by Stephenie Meyer
  6. The Help by Kathryn Stockett
  7. Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto by Mark R. Levin
  8. The Shack by William P. Young
  9. Just Take My Heart: A Novel by Mary Higgins Clark
  10. Handle with Care: A Novel by Jodi Picoult

Do you own a Kindle? Do you download books for the masses every once in a while?

E-Book Buzz

As the Kindle 2 is unveiled, the buzzword in publishing is e-book, e-book, e-book.

It’s the only segment of the industry in which sales are growing, and this phenomenon has some readers worried (“I’ll miss the feel and smell of a new book”) while others are delighted (“The environmental benefits are worth the sacrifice”).

But what does it mean to authors? Speculation on that front is rampant as well.

  • “More new authors will be published because the production costs are so minimal.”
  • “Author advances will disappear, and it will be more difficult to earn a living as a novelist.”
  • “If you don’t have an e-book, you’re missing a whole section of the market.”

All three scenarios could come true.

Another interesting question: Will e-books fall into the same categories—traditionally published versus self-published—that print books do? Will novels from well established e-publishers automatically carry more prestige than an e-book from Author Unknown? I read a post today that stated unequivocally that one of the benefits of publishing an e-book is: “You don’t have to go through the obstacles and headaches involved in finding an agent and a publisher.”

What about distribution? If you don’t go though the headache of finding an e-book publisher, how will anyone find and buy your book? Just because your book is downloadable from your website or for sale on Amazon doesn’t guarantee that you’ll have buyers. The production quality and file choice matter too. You want your e-book to be downloadable to, and nicely displayed on, the major e-readers: Kindle, Sony Reader Digital, and Mobipocket Reader.

I’ve thought about all of this because I’ve considered self-publishing some of my early novels as e-books. Then I decided against it because the benefit would be minimal, and who needs the stigma of being a self-published e-book author? I know that statement will rile some people, but the attitude exists, whether valid or not. Well known authors, on the other hand, could probably do quite well selling e-books from their own websites.

Ultimately, as an author, I want to have all my books available both in print and e-files from traditional publishers with established distribution (and web traffic). But the publishing industry is changing and becoming much less clearly defined. As e-book sales grow and become a sizable chunk of the market, some of the old distinctions may disappear.

What do you think? Are e-books the future? And does it matter who produces them?

Five-Time Readers Favorite Award Winner!

LATEST REVIEWS

I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. The characters were compelling, the procedural work was dead-on, and the story was enthralling. Definitely recommended.”
~Michelle Gagnon, author of Boneyard
The author expertly intertwines multiple story lines, presents readers with fully realized characters that readers will feel they know, and keeps the action and suspense levels high. That’s a lot to expect from an author but L. J. Sellers delivers.” ~OverMyDeadBody
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