Hello Friends!
I hope everyone is doing well. It’s been a crazy year. I’ve written several scripts, and I’m hopeful The Extractor will make it to the screen someday. I also co-authored a book with Teresa Burrell (The Advocate). NO CONSENT is the first in a new series featuring new characters, and we had a blast writing it. October 5th is the release date, and we’re hosting a launch party with lots of prizes. Join us on Zoom from 4-6.

NO CONSENT
A stressed-out prosecutor needs help from a charming ex-con. What could possibly go wrong?

District Attorney Clara Hitchens faces two major battles—exposing a corrupt DA, who might be her boss, while handling a high-profile trial with a victim who isn’t sympathetic. When Hitch runs into Nate Conner, he’s the last person she would expect help from.

Newly released from jail, Conner has his own problems. A thug is pressuring him for money, and his little sister Kaylee is missing. Determined to go straight, Conner decides that Hitch is the one person he can trust with his suspicions.

They develop a plan, but everything goes sideways.

The snitch who testified against Conner turns up dead, and all the evidence points to him. Then another key player is murdered, and Kaylee goes deeper into hiding, On top of all that, Hitch’s trial gets derailed when the victim’s OnlyFans videos are revealed in court—a devasting blow.

Can Conner and Hitch beat the odds to bring down the corrupt prosecutor, win the trial, and find Kaylee in time to save her?

Order it now while it’s discounted 20%!

My Greatest Fan


I’d like to introduce you to Sergeant Isaac Hutchison, my greatest fan. He’s a military police officer stationed in El Paso, Texas. He just found out he’s going back to Iraq in January. He already spent a year and half of his young life there, but he serves his country willingly and proudly. And I am proud—beyond words—of him.

My proudest moment as an author came many years ago after a midnight phone call. I stumbled to the phone, half asleep and half panicked, thinking, “What’s wrong?” Isaac’s voice came on the phone and said, “Oh my God. You blew me away.” I didn’t know what he was talking about. “I just finished your novel, and I had to call you and tell you how much I loved it. I loved your characters. I want to be Eric.” He recently told me he read that particular novel four times. And it’s possible my story character shaped who he turned out to be—a thoughtful, passionate man who cares about so much of the world beyond himself.

Isaac was also my first fan. He started reading my novels almost 20 years ago when they were still in manuscript form. Anytime I printed a copy of a novel or first three chapters that wasn’t good enough to send out, the stack of paper would go into a recycling box for the kids to use as math scratch paper or for drawings. Isaac would grab a stack of paper from the box, take it to his room, and read chunks of my stories. They were often just bits and pieces, 10 pages of this section and 40 pages of something else. He would often ask me to tell him how it all turned out.

Years later, he was as excited as I was to finally see my novels in print. Today, he brags about me and my writing to anyone who will listen. Now he’s waiting anxiously for the next installment. Whenever I’m having anxiety about not being good enough, I can count on him for moral support. I’m lucky to have such a fan. And such a fine son.

Slowing Down for Feedback

I am one of the most impatient people I know. I want everything to happen now! And this is most true when it comes to sending out my work: articles to magazines, letters to potential clients, fiction manuscript to agents and publishers. I am always excited about my project and want to send it off as soon as I’ve finished it. And in the past, I have—only to discover later a typo or inconsistency. Or to come up with a better idea that it’s too late to include.

I am learning—the hard way—to slow down. Let the piece chill for a day, or a week, or a month. Look at it again. Show it others first. Rethink the whole thing. This is not easy for me.

Recently, Helen posted a question about the reader hook. Does the book have to grab you in the first line, the first paragraph, the first page, or the first chapter? I responded: First line is best, but by the end of the first page is essential. So now I need to know if I can pass my own litmus test. This is the first paragraph of my new novel, Secrets to Die For. Is it good enough to make you keep reading?

Sierra shut off the motor and glanced up at the puke-green doublewide with a chunk of plywood over the front window. The near dusk couldn’t hide the broken dreams of the trailer’s occupants, Bruce and Cindy Gorman. But Sierra wasn’t here to see them. She was here for Josh, their eight-year-old son.